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Immigration Update

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Facing Deportation? A Lawyer May Be Able to Help

Deportation Nanda Lawyers

Deportation Nanda Lawyers

Immigration Law is a field of Canadian law that is of great interest to many. The purpose of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act is to ensure that families are united. Families stay together when they successfully exercise their right to obtain lawful immigration status. Unfortunately, the complex immigration process can be overwhelming – especially for a foreign national who faces immigration challenges in Canada or overseas while seeking to gain immigration status. Foreign nationals and permanent residents who are found inadmissible may face extreme challenges of being removed from Canada. Too many Canadian families have suffered the heartbreak of deportation.

If you or a loved one is facing deportation or removal, call Nanda and Associates as soon as possible. Our experienced Mississauga immigration lawyers have helped many Canadian families with their immigration cases. Our staff speaks fifteen different languages, including English, French, Hindi, Punjabi, Gujarati, Bangla, and Chinese, Italian, Telugu and Tamil. We have the legal experience, language support, and sensitivity to help your family during this difficult time.

What are my legal rights during deportation proceedings?

Immigration rights in Canadian law are governed by the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. There are many legal protections a foreign national has during removal proceedings, and it is important to hire an attorney who can enforce these rights:

The Right to an Admissibility Hearing

If your case has been referred to the Immigration Division for removal, you have the right to a admissibility hearing to determine whether you are admissible into Canada. When you are determined to be admissible, it means that you have the legal right to be in the country. At this hearing, you have the right to a defence. You can present evidence and give testimony. Most importantly, you have the right to hire a lawyer. An experienced immigration lawyer will know how to present an effective case for admissibility. An attorney will also know how to preserve legal issues for appeal.

The Right to Appeal a Removal Order

A permanent resident or protected person (legally recognized refugee) has the right to appeal to the Immigration Appeal Division. To allow an appeal, the Immigration Appeal Division must be satisfied that, at the time that the appeal is disposed of,

(a) the decision appealed is wrong in law or fact or mixed law and fact;
(b) a principle of natural justice has not been observed; or
(c) other than in the case of an appeal by the Minister, taking into account the best interests of a child directly affected by the decision, sufficient humanitarian and compassionate considerations warrant special relief in light of all the circumstances of the case.

No appeal may be made to the Immigration Appeal Division by a foreign national or their sponsor or by a permanent resident if the foreign national or permanent resident has been found to be inadmissible on the grounds of security, violating human or international rights, serious criminality or organized criminality. “Serious criminality” involves a crime that was punished in Canada by a term of imprisonment of at least six months. Of course, there are cases where the alleged security violations, human or international rights violations, serious criminality, or organized criminality are not founded. In this case, it might be possible to challenge the government’s allegations in an immigration court.

The Right to Judicial Review

After you have exhausted your right of appeal within the Immigration Division, Canadian law allows you the right to appeal a decision, determination, or order made, a measure taken, or a question raised under the Immigration Act. This is made by an application to the Federal Court. If a judge grants leave to file your application with the Federal Court, he or she shall also schedule a hearing on your application. The Immigration Act provides that this hearing be no sooner than thirty days and no longer than ninety days after the leave is granted. As with an appeal to the Immigration Division, you have the right to put on a defence. You can present evidence and give testimony. An experienced immigration lawyer’s guidance can make a significant difference in the outcome of your case.

The Right Attorneys for Immigration Cases in Brampton

Canadian law provides legal rights to anyone facing deportation proceedings in Canada. It is important for immigrants to have the advice of a lawyer who can explain these rights and defend them to the Immigration Division. Call Nanda and Associates at 905-405-0199 or contact us online as soon as you become aware of immigration court proceedings against you or your loved ones. Our Brampton based immigration lawyers have helped defend the rights of many Canadian families. They are experienced in all types of immigration cases, and they can help you navigate the complicated immigration process.

Canada Joins World’s Largest Trade Pact with 5 Other Countries – As the US Stays Away

Canada Joins World’s Largest Trade Recently, a consortium of 6 countries activated the Comprehensive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP). Brunei, Peru, Chile, Malaysia, Vietnam are also set to ratify the treaty. With Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Japan and Canada in the deal, it now encompasses more than 13.5% of the global GDP.

Across the Pacific, a new world trade order is taking shape without the US. Strategic leadership of America is increasingly eroding with the latest developments. With the Trump administration’s thinly veiled attempts to derail the treaty, eleven countries, including Canada are taking the lead to put the CPTPP back on track.

A New World Trade Order Emerges

With the CPTPP taking shape, established barriers to trade are melting away in the majority of the goods. Over the coming years, the CPTPP promises to eradicate more than 18000 tariffs and reduce others substantially.

The Trans-Pacific Trade pact comes into effect as the protectionism increases in the world. Even though US was the primary country drafting the treaty when Obama was President, an executive order signed by Trump in 2017 pulled the US out of the pact.

Equal treatment of countries is the new norm in the trade pact. Costs of compliance, rules of origin and customs clearance charges are also planned to be slashed heavily. The area covered under the treaty is poised to be a rapidly growing region of the world, bigger than EU’s market post Brexit.

Many countries have already shown interest in being a part of it. Colombia, Indonesia, Taiwan, Thailand, South Korea and the UK despite being in the Atlantic have expressed a desire to join. A new world trade order is waiting to take off with the emergence of this treaty.

Earlier known as Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the US devised this trade pact to contain Asia’s massive growth, particularly that of China. Conceived as an instrument of US foreign policy, it has now contained the US itself.

When President Trump pulled out the US from the treaty, many saw it as a strategic blunder. He deemed it to be a disaster for US workers and assumed that without the US, it would wither away. Alas, the White House was under completely wrong notions. Long term US allies have gone ahead to join the CPTPP, despite US pressure to refrain from doing so.

The Peterson Institute in Washington deems America to be the biggest loser in the bargain. By not joining the treaty, the US stands to lose an opportunity to enter many lucrative markets while New Zealand, Canada and Australia will reign supreme.

Global Trade Map Set to Change

China is also waiting on the sidelines, waiting for an opportunity to join the trade pact.

The current 90-day truce in China and US trade war risks the imposition of US tariffs on Chinese goods from 10pc to 25pc. If exorbitant tariffs get imposed upon China, it risks endangering more than $1 trillion of bilateral trade and its economic impact on global trade could be shocking.

Earlier China focussed on creating the One Belt, One Road programme through infrastructure projects in diverse faraway countries. It was utilizing its huge current account surplus and debt financing to acquire strategic assets and ports around the Indian Ocean.

Due to the stiff backlash faced by the Chinese government, they were on the lookout for other trade options. The US has allowed China an easy path to get into the multilateral framework of CPTPP.

How We Can Help

Whether you are a business owner wanting to establish your business or get connected with partners in Canada or set up your subsidiary here, we can help.

At Nanda & Associate Lawyers, our experienced Immigration lawyers and Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (RCIC) will create tailored and customized solutions. Whether it is preparing a business opportunities plan or get work permits for your global employees, at Nanda & Associate Lawyers, our knowledgeable team will help you achieve the favourable outcomes.

Express Entry on the verge of breaking ITA record with latest draw

IRCC now only 124 invitations away from new Express Entry invitation record
Express Entry on the verge of breaking ITA record with latest drawThe Government of Canada moved another step closer to surpassing the record for invitations issued in a single year through the Express Entry economic immigration system with a new draw held Wednesday. 

The 3,900 invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence (ITAs) issued today puts the total number issued in 2018 at 85,900 — just 123 shy of last year’s record-setting ITA total of 86,023.

The minimum score in today’s draw was 445, the same as the previous draw on November 28.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) typically holds an Express Entry invitation round every two weeks, which means another draw is possible this year and 2017’s ITA record could fall.

At this same point in 2017, IRCC had issued 83,273 ITAs and finished the year with a draw on December 20.

The federal Express Entry system manages the pool of candidates for Canada’s three Federal High Skilled economic immigration programs — the Federal Skilled Worker ClassFederal Skilled Trades Class and Canadian Experience Class.

Eligible candidates are given a ranking score based on factors such as age, education, work experience and proficiency in English or French. This score determines their position in the Express Entry pool, and a set number of the highest-ranked are issued ITAs through regular draws from the pool.

IRCC used its tie-break rule in the December 12 draw. The time stamp used was November 28, 2018, at 09:51:43 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 445, as well as those candidates with scores of 445 who entered their profile in the Express Entry pool before November 28, 2018, at 09:51:43 UTC, received an ITA in this invitation round.

Express Entry’s Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) provides additional points for factors such as arranged employment, a sibling living in Canada or a nomination through an Express Entry-linked Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) stream.

A provincial nomination is the most valuable factor under the CRS and results in an additional 600 points. With minimum scores ranging as low as 440 for all-program draws in 2018, these 600 points would effectively guarantee an ITA.

All nine Canadian provinces and two territories that participate in Canada’s PNP have at least one immigration stream that is linked to the Express Entry system.

Data from IRCC for the first eight months of 2018 show invitations to Express Entry candidates with a provincial nomination totalled 12 per cent of all ITAs issued during that period, up from nine per cent during that same period in 2017.

This increase reflects the PNP’s growing importance under IRCC’s new multi-year immigration levels plan, which has admissions through Canada’s PNP set to rise to 61,000 — an increase of 6,000 over 2018’s target of 55,000.

By 2021, admissions through the PNP are expected to reach 71,300 — an increase of nearly 30 per cent over this year’s Federal High Skilled target of 55,000 new permanent residents.

IRCC’s 2019 target for admissions through its Federal High Skilled immigration category is also set to rise in 2019 to 81,400, an increase of 6,500 over 2018’s target of 74,900.

The majority of candidates admitted to Canada through the Federal High Skilled category have their applications for permanent resident status processed through the Express Entry system.

The following are hypothetical examples of candidates who would have obtained an ITA in the December 12 draw:

Damien is 32 and holds a Bachelor’s degree as well as a two-year diploma. He has been working for five years as a finance clerk overseas. He took the IELTS exam and scored a 7 in Writing, Speaking and Reading and an 8 in the Listening. Although he has never worked or studied in Canada, his CRS score of 446 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in today’s draw.

Laurie and Jeremy are both 30 years old and hold a Bachelor’s degree and a one-year certificate from their studies outside Canada. Both have been working for the past three years as consultants. After taking the IELTS exam, Laurie scored a 7 in Speaking and Writing, and a 7.5 in Reading. She obtained an 8 in Listening. Jeremy, on the other hand, a obtained an IELTS 5 in Reading and Speaking, respectively, and a 5 in Listening. His writing score was 6.

Laurie applied as the principal applicant.  While neither of them had worked or studied in Canada, their CRS score of 445 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in today’s draw.

“It’s now down to the wire to see if IRCC will break its ITA record this year,” said David Cohen, senior partner with the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal. “A new record would be a fitting way to end what’s been a pivotal year in the development of Canada’s Express Entry system.”

Quebec reduces Immigration Numbers for 2019, increases tensions with Ottawa

Quebec reduces Immigration Numbers for 2019, increases tensions with OttawaQuebec recently announced plans to reduce the number of immigrants to be accepted in 2019, giving rise to tensions with Ottawa. This decision is in line with the promise made in the election campaign by Premier François Legault.

40,000 is the number of immigrants expected to be welcomed by the province. It is 24 per cent lesser than the number of immigrants who are supposed to enter Quebec by the end of 2018.

It is setting up a collision course between the new Coalition Avenir Québec (CAQ) government and the Liberal government at the centre who have a meeting scheduled in December.

Expected Immigration Numbers for 2019

The fall in the number of immigrants is expected in the provincially controlled group of economic immigrants and qualified workers. It is also set to affect the federally controlled newcomer categories of immigration by up to 2800 including family reunifications which have parents, children and spouses as well. The number of asylum seekers and refugees would also be lower by 2,450.

Many groups working with refugees and immigrants said the announcement is stirring panic amongst families in Quebec who fear not being allowed to be reunited. The CAQ criticized the move as it is not helping the province which is suffering from a long existing workforce shortage.

Liberals too were not impressed. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau questioned the timing of the move. He also mentioned the name of business people, who are apprehensive about labour shortage.

The move was the campaign promise of Legault. He had pledged to reduce immigration to bring the numbers in line with labour market requirements. Protecting the identity, language and values of Quebec was also one of the objectives. The fact that about one in five immigrants ends up leaving the province also contributed to this decision.

In turn, the federal government said that they would continue discussions with the hope of maintaining the numbers of the family reunification program.

Dominic LeBlanc, the minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, was disappointed with the decision. He mentioned the need to avoid a differential federal and provincial system for reuniting families. He also added that both governments need to fulfill their international commitment to take in refugees.
While Legault mentioned that lower immigration levels were the primary election promise of his government. He also added that the people of Quebec want them to make good on the promise. Quebec Immigration minister, Simon Jolin-Barrette said that this is just a transition and the reduction is temporary.

He said that Quebec wants to fully support the immigrants in their integration in Quebec.

The provincial government’s decision did not go down well with an umbrella organization working with refugees and immigrants in Quebec. The Table de concertation des organismes au service des personnes réfugiées et immigrantes said it is unparalleled in Quebec’s immigration history and is equally cruel.

Lida Ahgasi, the co-president of the Table said that numerous families are in a panic with the thought of not being able to reunite with their families. Quebec is assured to get higher federal funding for immigration despite this new announcement. Even though Quebec went ahead on their plan without informing the federal government, the 1991 Canada-Quebec immigration deal will allow it to secure higher funding for the integration of immigrants in 2019.

How We Can Help

Even though Quebec is reducing its immigrant intake, many provinces across Canada are increasing their immigration targets. Further many programs for immigrants are available to move to Canada offered by the Federal Government of Canada.

If you are considering applying for Express Entry System or need assistance in applying for any provincial nomination, we can help.

At Nanda & Associate Lawyers, our experienced Immigration lawyers and Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant (RCIC) will create tailored and customized solutions. Whether it is preparing an Express Entry Profile or Provincial Nominee Program application, at Nanda & Associate Lawyers, our knowledgeable team is always with you.

Ontario’s Human Capital Priorities Stream issues new invitations to Express Entry candidates

Human Capital Priorities Stream has now issued 3,719 invitations in 2018

Ontario’s Human Capital Priorities Stream issues new invitations to Express Entry candidatesOntario’s Human Capital Priorities Stream issued 185 invitations in a draw held November 26 — the popular Express Entry-linked stream’s first invitations since August 9.

The Human Capital Priorities Stream allows the Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) to search the federal Express Entry pool for candidates who meet its provincial and federal criteria and invite those selected to apply for a provincial nomination for permanent residence.

Express Entry candidates who apply for and receive a provincial nomination from Ontario receive an additional 600 points toward their Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score, which moves them to the front of the line for an Invitation To Apply for permanent residence from Canada’s federal government.

A candidate’s CRS score determines their rank in the Express Entry system, which manages the pool of candidates for Canada’s three federal economic immigration categories — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

Express Entry candidates selected in the November 26 draw had CRS scores ranging from 350 to 448 and a job offer in Ontario, which is not required in order to be eligible for the Human Capital Priorities Stream.

Those selected submitted their profile in the Express Entry system between January 1, 2018, and November 22, 2018.

In an update, the OINP said this “targeted search was done to help Ontario meet its labour market and economic development priorities, as well as to be more responsive to employer needs.”

In September, the OINP announced that it was replacing the requirement that Express Entry candidates have a CRS score of at least 400 in order to eligible for the Human Capital Priorities Stream. Moving forward, the OINP said the minimum score would be determined by the program’s director in accordance with the province’s needs.

The OINP relies heavily on its three Express Entry-linked streams: the Human Capital Priorities Stream alone has accounted for 3,719 invitations this year, followed by the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream at 1,519 and the Skilled Trades Stream at 1,626.

Together, these three streams also issued 95 per cent of Ontario’s nomination allocation under Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program for 2018.

Applications for a provincial nomination submitted in response to invitations received in today’s draw will be considered under the OINP’s 2019 nomination allocation.

The OINP has now issued targeted invitations in each of its last four draws through the Human Capital Priorities Stream.

Three of these draws have targeted Express Entry candidates with a job offer in Ontario while the fourth targeted Express Entry candidates with proficiency in French.

Two of these draws saw the minimum CRS score drop to 351, while the last two targeted job offer draws saw the minimum score drop to 350.

New invitations also issued Skilled Trades, French-Speaking Skilled Workers

Ontario also issued new invitations through its Express Entry-linked Skilled Trades and French-Speaking Skilled Worker streams.

The Skilled Trades invitation round took place on November 26 and saw a total of 181 invitations issued, while a November 22 French-Speaking Skilled Worker draw issued 43 invitations.

The French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream has been extremely active this year, with draws taking place almost every week. This stream is for French-speaking Express Entry candidates who have strong English language abilities (a minimum of CLB 6) and who want to live and work permanently in Ontario.

Candidates must be eligible for the Federal Skilled Worker Class or the Canadian Experience Class, and meet specified provincial criteria.

The Skilled Trades Stream allows the OINP to search the federal Express Entry pool for candidates currently living in Ontario who have a minimum of one year full-time work experience, or the equivalent in part-time work, in a skilled trade listed in Minor Group 633 or Major Group 72, 73, or 82 of Canada’s National Occupational Classification (NOC).

Skilled Trades candidates must also meet the eligibility requirements for the federal Canadian Experience Class.

Other Skilled Trades criteria include a minimum proficiency in English or French of Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) 5.

There is no minimum CRS score requirement for either the French-Speaking Skilled Worker or Skilled Trades stream.

Rare Thursday draw issues 3,900 invitations to Express Entry candidates

New draw leaves IRCC less than 8,000 invitations away from beating 2017 Express Entry record

Rare Thursday draw issues 3,900 invitations to Express Entry candidatesThe Government of Canada has issued 3,900 new invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence to Express Entry candidates in a draw held November 15. The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System score for this extremely rare Thursday draw was 449.

Today’s invitation round brings the number of invitations issued by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) in 2018 to 78,100, which leaves IRCC less than 8,000 invitations away from breaking the Express Entry record of 86,023 total invitations set last year.

The federal Express Entry system manages the pool of candidates for Canada’s three Federal High Skilled economic immigration programs — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class and Canadian Experience Class.

Eligible candidates are given a score under the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) that determines their position in the Express Entry pool, and a set number of the highest-ranked are issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA) through regular draws from the pool.

The minimum score in today’s draw — 449— was seven points higher than the previous Express Entry draw on October 29, which had a minimum score of 442.

IRCC used its tie-break rule in this latest invitation round. The date and time used was September 16, 2018, at 12:41:42 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 449, as well as those candidates with scores of 449 who submitted their profile before September 16, 2018 at 12:41:42 UTC, received an ITA in this invitation round.

When more time is allowed to elapse between draws, more candidates enter the Express Entry pool and that can have the effect of raising the minimum CRS score. In this case, 17 days were allowed to elapse between draws, which is three days longer than the usual two-week period.

Express Entry candidates who are looking to improve their CRS score can potentially do so in a number of ways.

An increasingly popular option is a nomination through an Express Entry-linked Provincial Nominee Program (PNP) stream, which results in an additional 600 points and effectively guarantees an invitation to apply for Canadian permanent residence.

Canada’s Provincial Nominee Program allows participating provinces and territories to nominate a set number of economic immigration candidates each year for permanent residence in Canada. Each participating province and territory has at least one immigration stream that is linked to the Express Entry system.

Among others, Express Entry-aligned PNPs in Ontario, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Prince Edward Island have been extremely active in 2018. Ontario alone has three Express Entry-linked streams, which accounted for 95 per cent of all nominations issued by the province in 2018.

Today’s draw continued a trend established on September 5 that has seen IRCC issue 3,900 ITAs in five of the six all-program draws held since then. These larger draws resulted in a Express Entry record 11,700 invitations in October — more than double the 5,558 that were issued in October 2017.

IRCC has a 2018 admissions target for its Federal High Skilled immigration category of 74,900 new permanent residents. This target is slated to grow to 81,400 in 2019, 85,800 in 2020 and 88,800 in 2021 under Canada’s updated multi-year immigration levels plan, which the government made public October 31.

The majority of candidates admitted to Canada through the Federal High Skilled category have their applications for permanent resident status processed through the Express Entry system.

The following are hypothetical examples of candidates who would have obtained an ITA in today’s draw:

Elyas is 29, has a Bachelor’s degree, has taken the IELTS exam and obtained an 8 in all categories and has five years of foreign work experience as a data analyst. Elyas has never worked or studied in Canada but has a brother who is a Canadian citizen, which allows him to receive points for a sibling in Canada. His CRS score of 453 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in today’s draw.

Naima is 34, has a Master’s degree and five years of foreign work experience as a marketing coordinator. Naima took the CELPIP exam, and obtained CLB 10 in all categories. While Naima has never worked or studied in Canada, her CRS of 454 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in the November 15 draw.

Alex is 32, has a Master’s degree and obtained IELTS 7 in Writing, Reading and Speaking and IELTS 8 in Listening. He has five years of foreign work experience as a business consultant, but no Canadian work or study experience. His CRS of 453 would have earned him an ITA in today’s draw.

Leila is 33 and has a Bachelor’s degree and a certificate. She has never worked or studied in Canada and has four years of foreign work experience as a school teacher. She wrote the IELTS exam and obtained an 8 in all categories. Leila’s CRS of 452 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in today’s draw.

Jordan is 29 and has a Bachelor’s degree. He obtained CLB 8 in all categories of the CELPIP exam, has one year of foreign work experience and has been working in Canada as a manager for two years. His CRS of 451 would have been sufficient to obtain an ITA in today’s draw.

“If the large draw sizes that we’ve been seeing since September continue, we could still beat last year’s record number of invitations,” said David Cohen, senior partner at the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal. “That would be a great way to end a year that’s been full of surprises on the Express Entry front, like today’s extremely rare Thursday draw.”

What is an Emigrant Vs Immigrant?

What is an Emigrant Vs Immigrant?Immigrant and Emigrant are two very similar sounding persons who in fact, have very diverse objectives.

Both Immigrant and Emigrant are looking to move across countries and maybe even continents. So, mobility is the common factor in both the terms. The movement can have permanent or temporary implications. So, either an Immigrant or Emigrant may be looking to make a permanent move to one country or making plans for a temporary relocation only.

Immigrant

An Immigrant is a person who is making plans to enter into another country and settle down there. The Immigrant would be wishing to find a new home in that country and live, work, study there. The Immigrant has an intention of settling down in the new country they move to and leave the previous country of residence permanently.

Immigration has permanent connotations, and an Immigrant plans to settle down in the new country forever or for a substantial number of years. An Immigrant needs to move across and cross political boundaries of different countries.

Emigrant

An Emigrant is a person who wishes to leave a country to stay in another country. Emigration has permanent connotations and involves leaving the political boundaries of one country while exiting the country.
Let’s look at an example to understand their differences better.

Example– Once a person immigrates to a country, they are considered, immigrants in that country. So, if a person immigrates to Canada, they are called Immigrants to Canada.

If a person exits a country, he/ she is called Emigrants from that country. So, a person from Hungary would be considered an Emigrant from Hungary and an Immigrant when they immigrate to Canada.

How We Can Help

Our skilled Immigration Lawyers and Consultants will assist you to resolve all your immigration queries. Whether you need help to understand the permanent residency eligibility requirements or prepare the citizenship application, our accomplished lawyers at Nanda & Associate Lawyers will ensure that you smoothly navigate the immigration process with successful outcomes.

Ontario issues new Express Entry invitations to French-speaking candidates

Ontario has now issued 1,065 invitations through its French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream.

Ontario issues new Express Entry invitations to French-speaking candidatesThe province of Ontario has issued another 44 invitations to Express Entry candidates through its French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream.

The Ontario Immigrant Nominee Program (OINP) has been issuing invitations through this stream on an almost weekly basis this year, and this latest draw brings the total number of invitations issued in 2018 to 1,065.

The draw was held exactly seven days after the previous draw on September 6, in which Ontario issued 15 invitations.

The French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream is for French-speaking Express Entry candidates who have strong English language abilities (a minimum of CLB 6) and who want to live and work permanently in Ontario.

Candidates must be eligible for the Federal Skilled Worker Class (FSWC) or the Canadian Experience Class (CEC), and meet specified provincial criteria.

The OINP says those issued Notifications of Interest (NOIs) in this latest draw submitted their Express Entry profiles between January 1, 2018, and September 13, 2018.

The OINP says receiving a NOI does not mean the recipient is qualified for the French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream. Everyone issued an NOI is asked to consult the stream’s eligibility requirements in order to ensure they meet its provincial and federal criteria.

The first step for anyone interested in Ontario’s French-Speaking Skilled Worker Stream is to find out if they are eligible for the Express Entry pool.

Quebec’s popular Immigrant Investor Program reopens September 10

Quebec’s popular Immigrant Investor Program reopens September 10The Quebec Immigrant Investor Program will reopen September 10 for a total of 1,900 applications.

This typically popular program is the only provincial immigration stream that allows applicants to obtain permanent residence through a passive investment.

This means that candidates are only required to make an investment in Quebec for a five-year term, whereas many Canadian provinces have immigration streams for entrepreneurs that require candidates to actively run a business.

As a result, quotas for the Quebec Immigrant Investor Program (QIIP) generally fill quickly. A maximum of 1,330 applications will be accepted from China (including Hong Kong and Macau) during the intake period, which is scheduled to remain open until March 15, 2019.

Modified criteria

Next week’s opening will be the first since modifications to the program’s eligibility criteria took effect on August 2.

The main modifications include higher net asset and investment requirements, which have been raised to CAD $2 million and CAD $1.2 million, respectively.

The previous requirements were net assets of CAD $1.6 million and an investment of CAD $800,000.

The investment must be for a five-year term with a subsidiary of Investissement Quebec and the investment agreement must be made through a financial intermediary authorized to participate in the QIIP.

The investment of CAD $1.2 million is guaranteed by the Quebec government and will be returned in full after five years.

Other eligibility requirements include being over 18 years of age, having management experience, intending to settle in the province of Quebec and obtaining a passing score under Quebec’s points system.

To calculate your potential points under the QIIP scoring system, use the Quebec Immigrant Investor Program (QIIP) calculator.

Quebec’s two other business immigration programs, the Quebec Entrepreneur Program and the Quebec Self-Employed Worker Program, opened August 15 to new applications.

Minimum score stays at 2018 low of 440 in latest Express Entry draw

Minimum score stays at 2018 low of 440 in latest Express Entry drawA new Express Entry draw held August 22 has issued a total of 3,750 invitations to apply for Canadian permanent residence. The minimum Comprehensive Ranking System score in this draw was 440.

This is the third draw in 2018 to feature a minimum score of 440, which is the lowest CRS score drawn in 2018 to date. Both the minimum CRS score and the draw size in the August 22 were the same as the previous draw, held on August 8.

The Express Entry system manages the profiles of candidates in Canada’s three main federal economic immigration categories — the Federal Skilled Worker Class, the Federal Skilled Trades Class and the Canadian Experience Class.

Candidates are ranked according to their Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score and the highest-ranked candidates are issued an Invitation to Apply (ITA) through regular invitation rounds.

The tie-break date and time used in this draw was February 21, 2018, at 11:28:03 UTC. This means that all candidates with a CRS score above 440, as well as those candidates with scores of 440 who submitted their profile before this specified date and time, received an ITA in this invitation round.

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has now issued 3,750 ITAs in every draw held since June 13. The regular pace of these larger draws, which have been held roughly every two weeks, could be what has helped keep the CRS score at 440 and not let it go higher.

ITAs-issued-2018-draw-17

There are several ways for Express Entry candidates to improve their scores, including a provincial nomination that results in 600 additional CRS points. Express Entry-linked Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) have been extremely active and innovative in 2018.

IRCC has now issued a total of 54,700 ITAs over 17 draws in 2018, which puts it slightly ahead of the 54,487 ITAs that were issued over the first 17 draws of 2017. However, IRCC had issued 60,742 ITAs in 2017 by this same point in August, which in that sense puts IRCC 6,042 ITAs behind last year’s pace.

A total of 86,023 ITAs were issued in 2017, which more than doubled the ITA totals of 2015 and 2016 combined. Given Canada’s increased admission targets for 2018 and 2019, it remains possible that this year’s total could surpass the number of ITAs issued in 2017.
ITAs draw August 22 Targets
The following hypothetical example illustrates candidates who would have obtained an ITA in today’s draw:

Anil and Yasmeen are married, each holds a Bachelor’s degree, and they have been working for eight and four years respectively. Anil works as a financial analyst and Yasmeen works as a teacher. They each wrote the IELTS and scored 8 in each category. Anil is 34 years old and Yasmeen is 29. Neither has ever worked or studied in Canada. They entered the pool with Yasmeen as the principal applicant because she scored more points for age. Their CRS score of 440 was sufficient to obtain an ITA during the most recent Express Entry draw.

“The CRS minimum isn’t going up, which is likely due to the large size of the draws we’ve been seeing since June,” said David Cohen, senior partner with the Campbell Cohen Canadian immigration law firm in Montreal. “There’s still a long way to go until the end of the year, and Canada’s larger admission targets for 2018 and 2019 mean we could be looking at an active fall on the Express Entry front.”