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Activities Which Are Still Prohibited Even After Marijuana Legalization

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Activities Which Are Still Prohibited Even After Marijuana Legalization

Activities Which Are Still Prohibited Even After Marijuana Legalization

With Cannabis being legalized across Canada recently, did you know that there are many related activities which are still considered illegal? Let’s look at a few of them.

  1. Purchasing and Consuming Cannabis edibles

    As per the Cannabis Act, Canadians are not allowed to purchase cannabis edibles, though they can make and eat home-made edibles. Edible marijuana laws are due for release, and cannabis lovers will need to wait for them before they can confidently go out and purchase them from an authorized store.

  2. Unlicensed Sale of cannabis

    Every Canadian can now grow their pot at home legally, but they cannot sell it to others without a proper license. Only licensed retailers are allowed to sell cannabis. Unlicensed sellers risk facing very high fines and up to 14 years in jail if they charge money for their pot. Sharing is allowed amongst adults but has to be up to a maximum of 30 grams.

  3. Sharing cannabis with Minor

    Selling or sharing cannabis with any minor under the age of 18 is deemed to be a criminal offence. Any adult over the age of 18 can be punished up to a maximum of 14 years in prison if they give marijuana to a minor.

  4. Public Consumption

    Different Canadian provinces have created their own rule regarding the consumption of marijuana. In Manitoba, cannabis can be consumed only in private homes and not in any public spaces. Since provinces have different provisions, it is wise to know about a province’s rule before you end up visiting or travelling there.

  5. Keeping and Carrying in excess of 30 grams

    In homes, Canadians can store more than 30 grams of cannabis or its equivalent in non-dried variety, but keeping or publicly carrying it is not allowed. The Cannabis Act punishes this activity with penalties going up to five years of jail time.

  6. Impaired Driving

    Similar to alcohol, driving when impaired with cannabis is considered illegal. Roadside tests will measure THC (psychoactive ingredient) levels in the blood of the driver and anything above 2 nanograms per millilitre is liable for penalties. The driver can face steep fines or long jail times.

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